Category Archives: entertaining

Happiness Is A Weekend Of Bubbles…Wine Flies When You’re Having Fun!

Kitchen Remodel Update:  We added a new window to the back wall of our kitchen. When we looked out the new window we were delighted to find 4 little blue Robin’s eggs tucked into a nest in the Rhododendron tree.  Fortunately Mama Robin has not been disturbed by the construction.

Happy Weekend!

One of the nicest things about remodeling our kitchen is the way our family and friends have been taking care of us…treating us to dinner in their homes or taking us out to dinner.  So thoughtful!

Our fun weekend began on Thursday evening when our bubbly friends welcomed us to their beautiful apartment overlooking downtown Roanoke with glasses of  Mumm Napa Cuvée with a fresh raspberry in the bottom of each flute.  The Cuvée was a very pleasant bubbly surprise with aromas and flavors of toast, pear, apple and citrus.  Rich body, smooth with a creamy mousse.  $26 range.

Our bubbly friend made the most wonderful cheese crackers served with fig jam.  I can’t wait to make these when my kitchen is back up and running, but until then here’s a couple of links to Ina Garten’s cheese crackers recipes ~ delicious!

http://www.food.com/recipe/barefoot-contessas-parmesan-black-pepper-crackers-ina-garten-215143

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/blue-cheese-and-walnut-crackers-recipe/

On Saturday evening we enjoyed this lovely pink bottle of Broadbent Vinho Verde Rosé that looked so pretty on my bubbly friend’s tablescape. $10 range. Vibrant aromas and flavors of fresh strawberry, pomegranate and orange zest with a little spritz of effervescence. We enjoyed every sip.

So excited that the Grandin Road Farmer’s Market is now open on Saturday mornings!  These baby turnips were a fabulous find…eat them whole (with butter and sea salt to dip them in if you prefer…just like radishes) or slice them to add to salads. Delicious and a little more sweet than radishes.

Edible Flowers!

Finished the weekend with MASfi Cava…100% Trepat grapes.  Bright and clean. Cherry and strawberry are the the predominant flavors in this Cava.  Lively pink color. $12 range.  And since it is “Mimosa Season”, this cava made a nice strawberry mimosa!  I will have some yummy seasonal mimosa ideas in my next blog post…stay tuned!

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Poutine Poppers, Butter Chicken Spring Rolls…Appetizers In 10 Minutes!

As we head towards the lazy days of summer,  I am always looking for ways to get out of the kitchen and outside to the deck to visit with my guests.  Trade in my spatula for a glass of wine and reeeeelax. I have always been a proponent of homemade appetizers since frozen appetizers are usually tasteless and boring. So I was pleasantly surprised to find Private Selection frozen appetizers at Kroger that are actually quite delicious.  http://www.privateselection.com/about-us/

The Poutine Poppers are cheese curds, shredded potato and rich gravy in a deliciously crispy potato breading.  These little pops of yummyness are inspired by the rich flavors of Quebec cuisine.

So what the heck is “Quebec Cuisine”? From Wikipedia:

In Quebec, Poutine are French Fries topped with gravy and cheese curds.

Quebec’s traditional cuisine is as rich and diverse as the province of Quebec itself. The historical context of ‘traditional’ Quebec cuisine is from the fur trade period, and many dishes have a high fat content. The strongest influences on traditional Quebec cuisine come from the cuisines of France and Ireland.  

Crispy without frying!

Butter Chicken Spring Rolls are inspired by the fragrant flavors of India and East Asia.  Beginning with chicken, vegetables and sweet and creamy Butter Chicken Sauce, this unexpected twist on the classic spring roll is a perfect way to add global flavor to your entertaining.

The Hatch Chili and Cheese Puffs (16 count) came in their own little bake-able tray (to help keep their shape) and took 25 minutes to bake. Buttery puff pastries filled with rich cream cheese and Monterrey Jack cheese blended with hot Hatch chilies and green chilies.  These little puffs do have a little bit of a bite to them!

This Notorious Pink Rosé wine was a very nice compliment to the Hatch Chili and Cheese Puffs.   The Notorious Pink is a Grenache Rosé with lovely strawberry notes.  I love the pink glass top and the wine has a very light pink tint as it is poured into the glass. $19 range.

And the Swan Song for the oven in my current kitchen before starting remodeling tomorrow…will it be Duck à l’Orange, Beef Wellington perhaps?  No…Tater Tots!  ( Alexia Garlic and Black Pepper Potato Puffs from Fresh Market which are actually yummy for a quick treat.)  http://www.alexiafoods.com/products/potatoes/crispy-seasoned-potato-puffs

Photo of the inside of a ruby-red tulip that greeted me on my walk this morning.

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Discover The Secret In The Sauce ~ Herb and Cheese Parisienne Gnocchi

Herb and Cheese Parisienne Gnocchi

Zoe Campbell, Pastry Chef, demonstrates preparation of Herb and Cheese Parisienne Gnocchi during the  Center Stage Catering Country French Culinary Workshop.

from: http://www.ouichefnetwork.com

from Thomas Keller’s cookbook –  “Bouchon”

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 12 tablespoons (6 ounces) unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour, sifted
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon chopped chervil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped chives
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped tarragon
  • 1 cup loosely packed shredded Emmentaler cheese
  • 5 to 6 large eggs

Method:

  1. Set up a heavy-duty mixer with the paddle attachment. Have all the ingredients ready before you begin cooking.
  2. Combine the water, butter, and the 1 teaspoon salt in a medium saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, add the flour all at once, and stir rapidly with a stiff heatproof or wooden spoon until the dough pulls away from the sides of the pan and the bottom of the pan is clean, with no dough sticking to it. The dough should be glossy and smooth but still moist.
  3. Enough moisture must evaporate from the dough to allow it to absorb more fat when the eggs are added: Continue to stir for about 5 minutes, adjusting the heat as necessary to prevent the dough from coloring. A thin coating will form on the bottom and sides of the pan. When enough moisture has evaporated, steam will rise from the dough and the aroma of cooked flour will be noticeable. Immediately transfer the dough to the mixer bowl. Add the mustard, herbs, and the 1 tablespoon salt. Mix for a few seconds to incorporate the ingredients and release some of the heat, then add the cheese. With the mixer on the lowest speed, add 3 eggs, one at a time, beating until each egg is completely incorporated before adding the next one. Increase the speed to medium and add another 2 eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each one. Turn off the machine. Lift some of the dough on a rubber spatula, then turn the spatula to let it run off: It should move down the spatula very slowly; if it doesn’t move at all or is very dry and just falls off in a clump, beat in the additional egg.
  4. Place the dough in a large pastry bag fitted with a 5/8-inch plain tip and let it rest for about 30 minutes at room temperature. (If you have only a small pastry bag, fill it with half the dough two times.) Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a simmer. Line a baking sheet with paper towels. Line a second baking sheet with parchment paper.
  5. Because this recipe makes such a large quantity of gnocchi, your arm may get tired: An easy way to pipe the gnocchi is to place a large inverted pot, canister, or other container that is slightly higher than the pot on the right side of the pot (left side if you are left-handed) and set the filled pastry bag on it so that the tip extends over the side and the container serves as a resting place for the bag. Twist the end of the pastry bag to push the dough into the tip. (From time to time, as the bag empties, you will need to twist the end again.) As you squeeze the back of the bag with your right hand, hold a small knife in your left hand and cut off 1-inch lengths of dough, allowing the gnocchi to drop into the pot. Pipe about 24 gnocchi per batch. First, the gnocchi will sink in the pot. Keep the water temperature hot, but do not boil. Once the gnocchi float to the top, poach them for another 1 to 2 minutes, then remove them with a slotted spoon or skimmer and drain on the paper towel–lined baking sheet. Taste one to test the timing; it may still seem slightly undercooked in the center, but it will be cooked again. Repeat with the remaining dough.
  6. When all the gnocchi have drained, place them in a single layer on the parchment-lined baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes, or up to a day. Or, for longer storage, place the baking sheet in the freezer. Once the gnocchi have frozen solid, remove them from the baking sheet and place in a freezer bag in the freezer. Before using frozen gnocchi, spread them in a single layer on a baking sheet and defrost in the refrigerator for several hours.

Beurre Blanc
The “secret” to this sauce is 2 pounds of butter!

source:  Larousse Gastronomic

Yield:  1 quart

1 fl. oz. white wine vinegar

4 fl. oz. white wine

1 1/2 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. white pepper

1 oz. shallot, minced

2 lb. whole butter, chilled

  1. Combine the white wine, white wine vinegar, salt, white pepper and shallot in a small saucepan.  Reduce the mixture until approximately 2 tablespoons of liquid remain. If more than 2 tablespoons of liquid are allowed to remain, the resulting sauce will be too thin.
  2. Cut the butter into pieces approximately 1 ounce in weight. Over low heat, whisk the butter a few pieces at a time, using the chilled butter to keep the sauce between 100 degrees Fahrenheit  and 120 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Once all of the butter has been incorporated, remove the saucepan from the heat. Strain through a chinois (or fine-meshed sieve) and hold the sauce at a temperature between 100 degrees Fahrenheit and 130 degrees Fahrenheit for service.

 

To serve:  toss the Herb and Cheese Parisienne Gnocchi with the warm Beurre Blanc.

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The Sparkling Maraschino Cherry “Cobbler” ~ The Drink of 1928!

The Sparkling Maraschino Cherry “Cobbler”

One of my favorite books is “The Bon Vivant’s Companion or How To Mix Drinks” by Professor Jerry Thomas, Formerly Principal Bartender at the Metropolitan Hotel, New York, and at the Planters’ House, St. Louis. This book was published in 1928.

This book bubbles over with fun…lovely cocktails that have all but disappeared from our 21st century cocktail lexicon as well as our palates…juleps, flips, fizzes, shrubs, daisies, toddies and YES COBBLERS!!!

As the weather gets warmer and Spring is getting ready to SPRING…I am falling in love with Cobblers:

Like the julep, this delicious potation is an American invention, although it is now a favorite in all warm climates.  The cobbler does not require much skill in compounding, but to make it acceptable to the eye, as well as to the palate, it is necessary to display some taste in ornamenting the glass after the beverage is made. (source:  “The Bon Vivant’s Companion”)

 Champagne Cobbler!

Up to 2 or 3 days prior to making the cobbler:  Place 12 frozen dark sweet cherries in 1/4 cup Maraschino Cherry Liqueur in a covered container in the refrigerator.  (Use pitted fresh sweet cherries when in season.)

For the cocktail:

In a martini glass combine 1 teaspoon Maraschino Cherry Liqueur and 1/2 teaspoon Triple Sec. Stir lightly to combine.  Add a few crushed ice cubes. Pour sparkling wine (or champagne) over the liqueur. Garnish with Maraschino Liqueur soaked cherries and a few fresh blackberries.  

Traditionally the Cobbler is served in a tumbler with shaved ice and sipped through a straw. Here’s “The Bon Vivant’s Companion” recipe for Champagne Cobbler:

Champagne Cobbler

One bottle of wine to four large bar glasses

 One tablespoon of sugar

One piece each of orange and lemon peel

Fill the tumbler one-third full with shaved ice, and fill balance with wine; ornament in a tasty manner with berries in season.  This beverage should be sipped through a straw.

 

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Weekend Dinner ~ The Buddha Bowl and Lime Cilantro Salsa Chili

Spring has sprung in Southwest Virginia where I live…even though there are 18 more days until it is officially Spring (March 20, 2017).  The flowering trees are in bloom, my daffodils are showing their cute little yellow blossoms and some of my lilies are popping out of the ground.

christina-cooking-class I have a major case of Spring Fever and can’t wait to get outside in the garden and visit our local Farmer’s Markets.  I love to visit a neighborhood village “Grandin Village” near my home when the weather starts to warm up. There’s lots going on in the village ~ cooking and food classes, wonderful restaurants, natural foods co-op and soon the village farmer’s market will open for the season.

I recently took a cooking class taught by food writer extraordinaire Christina Nifong at our local Natural Foods Co-op and I would love to introduce my readers to her fabulous recipes. One of her latest posts introduces “The Buddha Bowl” which is such a delightful way to utilize the fabulous fresh produce available in our farmer’s markets.

Christina explains the concept of the Buddha Bowl in her blog post: A Buddha Bowl is a bowl (some say it should be a favorite bowl or one with meaning so this meal feeds your spirit as well as your belly) that’s filled with one part grain, one part greens, one part protein. Top that layer with veggies (they can be grilled, sautéed, roasted, raw), and add nuts, fruit or herbs. Then tie the whole thing together with a clean, homemade dressing. 

http://christinanifong.com/2017/02/make-your-own-buddha-bowl/

Connect with Christina Nifong to sign up for her newsletter with this link:

http://christinanifong.com/category/blog/  (sign-up box for newsletter is on the right)

candy-cane-beettomatoescarrots

I will put these farmer’s market fresh vegetables in my Buddha Bowl (l to r: candy cane beet, Liberty tomatoes from Pulaski, Virginia, rainbow carrots)

chili-best-photorice

I am also on a “chili kick” these days.  Although chili is often thought of as a “Fall and Winter dish”, I enjoy chili all year round because there are so many variations of chili to choose from:

Cincinnati Chili:  Chili served over spaghetti

Chili Con Carne: no tomatoes, no beans

Vegetarian Chili

My recipe for Lime Cilantro Salsa Chili is not complicated so it’s easy to prepare for dinner.  The leftovers are delicious served over a baked potato or over tortilla chips topped with melted cheese and salsa to make nachos.

And my new favorite:  Lime Cilantro Salsa Chili

1.20 pounds ground beef

1.25 mild chili seasoning mix (I used McCormick’s brand for this recipe)

14.5 ounce can petite diced no-salt added tomatoes, not drained

2 cans (16 ounces) light red kidney beans, drained

16 ounce Frog Ranch mild salsa

1 (25.5 ounces) Muir Glen organic garden vegetable pasta sauce

(You can use your favorite brand of salsa and pasta sauce for this recipe.)

3 tablespoons honey

1/4 teaspoon salt

Garnishes: Avocado, sour cream, chopped green onion, fresh corn off the cob, shredded Mexican cheese blend,  hot sauce, tortilla chips

Brown the ground beef in a large soup pot. Drain the fat off the ground beef after browning.  Add the chili seasoning and the tomatoes. Stir to combine and heat over medium heat while adding other ingredients.  Add kidney beans, salsa and pasta sauce, stirring after adding each ingredient.  Add honey and salt and stir to combine all ingredients.  Simmer over medium-low heat for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. (I’ve found that one of the secrets to good chili is to simmer it long enough to allow the flavors to meld.)

Top with your favorite garnishes and serve warm over Zatarain’s Cilantro Lime Rice.

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ROSÉ CHAMPAGNES AND BUBBLIES YOU WILL LOVE FOR VALENTINE’S DAY!

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Happy Valentine’s Day February 14, 2017!
shoe-rose

Rose Petal Stiletto on our table at the Taubman Museum of Art 2016 Women’s Luncheon

So many bubbly rosé choices to celebrate Valentine’s Day with your love…here’s a sampling…expensive to affordable…

(Champagne prices listed in this blog may vary from the readers local stores and on-line sources.)

Rosé Champagne—A pink version of champagne, most often made by the blending of a little red wine with normally vinified white wine. Champagne is the only appellation in France that is allowed to blend red and white wine together. Rosé champagne can also be made with the saignée method, which involves macerating the juice on the grape skins in order to impart color.

http://www.champagneguide.net/information/glossary

If money is no object ~ $200 +

rose-champagne-krug1

  Krug Rosé Champagne NV

The Champagne Guide 2014-2015 rates Krug Rosé Champagne 98 points with these notes:

Pinot Noirs from the best vines in Ay are treated to a short fermentation on skins and then blended with pinot noir, pinot meunier and chardonnay fermented in small oak casks as white wine, before aging for a minimum of five years in bottle.

Its ethereal restraint and delicate air seems a paradox in the grand decadence of Krug, but such is the detailed intricacy of this medium salmon-tinted cuvée that it dances with light-footed grace on a stage of epic complexity.  Absolute restraint and taut freshness of strawberry hull, white cherry, red apple and lemon zest slowly unravel to nuances of anise and mixed spice.  An impeccable acid profile and pinpont bead define a remarkable finish of mind-blowing seamlessness, impeccable line and unrelenting persistence.  Most thrilling of all, its minerality is all encompassing, mouth-embracing and emphatically chalk-infused.

My notes on this beautiful champagne which we enjoyed on our anniversary were, well, to be honest, I was so blown away by actually tasting such a fine champagne that I did not take extensive notes.  My husband clearly remembers that I remarked repeatedly “I love this bubbly”!

That magical evening I served one of my favorite Ina Garten appetizers ~ Lobster Salad on Belgium Endive:  http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/lobster-salad-in-endive-recipe.html

$80 – $90 range:

rose-champagne-bellecart-salmon1

Billecart-Salmon Brut Rosé NV

Billecart-Salmon Brut Rosé NV ~ Wine Spectator rated this rosé champagne “92” with these notes:“Finely meshed and elegant, with mouth-watering acidity and a satiny texture carrying the delicate flavors of ripe raspberry, lemon shortbread, chalk and fresh ginger. Offers a clean, minerally finish. Drink now through 2020.”   

$70 – $80 range:

champagne-rose-1

 Laurent-Perrier  Cuvée Rosé Brut NV

Notes from The Champagne Guide 2014-2015:

Laurent-Perrier macarates its rosé for 12-72 hours, depending on fruit ripeness, until the color is fixed and the aroma resembles freshly picked raspberries.  So crucial is timing, legend has it that the first Chef de Cave, Edouard Leclerc, slept by the tank to stop it just in time! This wine has achieved that elusive ideal of volume and finesse, the world’s best-selling rosé champagne epitomizes the ultra-restraint of  rosé’s finest expressions.  All the more remarkable for the challenging  saignée method.

One of the first times that we served this delightful rosé, one of our guests exclaimed “Oh! Easter Wine!” She explained that her mother always liked to serve wine that matched her pink dining room drapes on Easter Sunday (White Zinfandel Wine). We all got quite a giggle over that story and we continue to call this  Rosé Brut “Easter Wine” to this day.

I paired this lovely champagne with slices of cucumber lightly spread with mascarpone cheese (cream cheese may be substituted) topped with smoked salmon and a dusting of fresh dill with a sprinkle of Old Bay Seasoning.

$60 – $70 Range  (price based on non-vintage)

veuve-rose-champagne

Veuve Clicquot Rosé NV 

50 to 55% Pinot Noir, 15 to 20% Pinot Meunier, and 28 to 33% Chardonnay. My notes: silky on the tongue, beautiful fine bubbles, lively black cherry and raspberry fruit and rich brioche.

Wine Spectator rates this rosé “91” with these notes:  “Bright and expressive, with mouth-watering acidity and refined texture, layered with black cherry, spiced plum, almond skin, honey and candied ginger notes. Shows lovely balance, offering a lasting finish of smoky mineral. Drink now through 2020.”

$45 – $50 range

argyle-2010-brut-rose-1

Argyle Brut Rosé Willamette Valley 2011

Wine Spectator tasting notes:  Argyle Brut Rosé Willamette Valley 2011. Light and refreshing, a refined style, with finesse to the balance of fruit and savory notes as the finish dances. Rated 91.

My tasting notes:

A lovely sparkling offering from Oregon. Tiny bubbles dance around the glass.  Pretty pale pink salmon color.  The first sip explodes with fresh ripe cherry flavors.  A blend of 70% pinot noir and 25% pinot meunier with a splash of chardonnay. The finish is creamy but with a little tingle on the tongue. This sparkly is well deserving of its 91 points. Cheers!

$25 – $30 range

charles-duret-champagne

 Charles Duret Cremant De Bourgogne Rosé

 This French sparkling wine is made using the traditional method or Méthode Traditionnelle used in Champagne. Lovely small consistent bubbles. A touch of brioche in the wine’s bouquet,  followed by aromas of blackcurrants and redcurrants.

$18 – $20 range:

rose-strawberry-2

Cleto Chiarli Brut de Noir Rosé

Rosé Vino Spumante Brut

I readily admit I am a sucker for a pretty wine label.  The Cleto Chiarli with its fancy label and frilly script pulled me right in.  Pretty pink in the glass. This sparkling is a wonderful value and a very enjoyable rosé  for relaxing sippin’.

Blend of Grasparossa and Pinot Nero grapes.  Raspberry and Strawberry notes are no surprise in this wine. The real surprise is the smooth finish…no acidic bite or tannins at the end of the sip…just a touch of refreshing lingering lemon at the very end.

After I purchased this bottle, chilled it and was sipping on it, I opened the Sunday, June 18, 2016 issue of the Wall Street Journal (thank you to my bubbly friend who always saves WSJ wine articles for me!) and found the article 20 Splendid Summer Wines – All Under $20.  The very wine I was sipping was recommended in this article:  The Emilia-Romagna region of Italy is as famous for Lambrusco as it is for cheese, though its Parmigiano-Reggiano may get more respect – or at least recognition – and that’s a shame.  A dry, frothy red like this is compulsively drinkable and great with food.  Serve well-chilled.  

$15 – $18 range:

rose-graham-beck

Graham Beck Brut Rosé Sparkling Wine

Wine Spectator notes:  “Soft and friendly, with good cherry and watermelon notes and an easygoing finish. Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.”   A blend of 59%, Pinot Noir and 41% Chardonnay.

My notes: Sparkling wine from South Africa. Inexpensive but drinkable.  Nice, consistent tiny bubbles in the glass.  Later in the year this will be a fun “porch sittin’ sparkly” (Southern for “sitting on the porch drinking sparkling wine in the sunshine”!)

$17 range:

champagne-aivery

Aimery Crémant Brut

‘Crémant’ sparkling wines are made using the same method as Champagne and with strict regulations around ageing. Ribbons of bubbles and sparkling notes of berries just like your favorite champagne, without breaking the bank.  Delicate, fresh with a long, mouth-filling finish. The color of this sparkling blushes just slightly and  tiny bubbles consistently rise to the top of glass.

$15 range:

rivarosa-sparkling-rose

Royal Provence Rivarose Brut Rosé

One of my favorites in this price range. The lacy label is so pretty! Produced in the southern Rhône Valley, fresh with notes of raspberry made from Syrah and Grenache grapes.

Here’s an article from LA Weekly with fun Pink Sparkling Wine suggestions for Valentine’s Day:

http://www.laweekly.com/restaurants/top-5-pink-sparkling-wines-for-valentines-day-or-any-day-really-2378218

rose-sign

heart-fountain-amsterdam

Rose kind of day

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Moët And Chandon Impérial Brut Champagne NV Magnum

moet-champagne

Moët and Chandon Impérial Brut Champagne NV Magnum

Elegant with notes of ripe pear, just a touch of citrus and lightly toasted brioche. Fine creamy mousse. Made from 50% Pinot Noir, 10% Chardonnay and 40%Pinot Meunier grapes. This bubbly is one of the largest-selling champagnes in the world.  I could sip on this lovely champagne all day.

As we are describing champagne, it is interesting to note that the term “bouquet” refers to the total scent of the wine, “aroma” is the scent of the grapes. The bouquet and the aroma together are referred to as the “nose”.

tv-champange-size-bottles

Champagne bottle sizes (left to right):

Jeroboam: Equals 4 standard bottles or 24 (4 oz.) glasses

Magnum: Equals 2 standard bottles or 12 (4 oz.) glasses

Standard: Equals 6 (4 oz.) glasses

Split:  Equals 1/4 standard bottle or 2 (4 oz.) glasses.

The bottles get even larger than a Jeroboam…a Rehoboam equals six; a Methuselah equals eight; a Salmanazar equals 12; a Balthazar equals 16; and a Nebuchadnezzar equals 20 regular bottles of Champagne.

Many champagne bottle sizes were inspired by Biblical characters. For example:

-Jeroboam: “First King of The Kingdom”
-Methuselah: “Oldest Man”
-Salmanzar: “Assyrian King”
-Balthazar: “One of The Wise Men”
-Nebuchadnezzar: “King of Babylon”
-Solomon: “King Solomon, the wisest of all men, built the Temple in Jerusalem”
-Melchizede: “Name of several priesthoods in different religions including the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints”

Winston Churchill had a champagne bottle size named after him. “The Winston Churchill” bottle was produced by Pol Roger (Churchill’s favorite champagne) and held 20 ounces of champagne, perfect for Churchill’s breakfast consumption.
146

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